Tony Abbott “Why not have a carbon tax”? The 2009 video in which Abbott argues for a price on carbon

Today in Australian politics we saw some extraordinary events centering around events that took place nearly 20 years ago.

Three years is a long time in politics: recall but three years ago Tony Abbott argued for a carbon tax:

He pushes the old “no temperature rise in ten years” myth, but listen carefully.

Quote: “If you want to put a price on carbon, why not do it with a simple tax?”

 

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22 thoughts on “Tony Abbott “Why not have a carbon tax”? The 2009 video in which Abbott argues for a price on carbon

  1. […] such. What Labor enacted was a fixed price period emissions trading scheme. Let us also recall that Abbott himself stated, “If you want to put a price on carbon, why not do it with a simple tax?”. Some might be kind […]

  2. [...] it would be very easy to doctor a video to show Abbott stating  “If you want to put a price on carbon, why not do it with a simple [...]

  3. [...] it would be very easy to doctor a video to show Abbott stating  “If you want to put a price on carbon, why not do it with a simple [...]

  4. [...] Tony Abbott “Why not have a carbon tax”? The 2009 video in which Abbott argues for a pri… (watchingthedeniers.wordpress.com) [...]

  5. [...] Tony Abbott “Why not have a carbon tax?”, Watching the Deniers, November 29 2012. [...]

  6. [...] 2012/11/29: WtD: Tony Abbott “Why not have a carbon tax”? The 2009 video in which Abbott… [...]

  7. Eric Worrall says:

    Mike, I think you are reading too much into this.

    Its a bit like when I argue that if you want to decarbonise the economy, the only viable option is nuclear power – so why do so many of your fellow travellers argue for useless non solutions like renewables? Why do you include uneconomical, unreliable renewables in your mix of energy solutions?

    I’m not suggesting that decarbonisation is necessary when I do this, I’m just pointing out the flaws in the alarmist position from several different angles.

    Which is what I think Abbott is doing, when he criticises the need for a carbon price, then goes on to criticise the implementation of a carbon price.

    • Eric,
      Referring to the “alarmist position” is a bit like referring to the “skeptic position”. I both cases there are very diverse opinions, and some people on both sides talk absolute nonsense, showing that they have no understanding of the science behind the position.
      Not all so called ‘renewables’ are uneconomic and unreliable, although I certainly agree that some people include uneconomic and unreliable things in their suggested energy mixes.

      • eworrall1 says:

        The only renewable which is even vaguely viable is hydro, and there are only so many river systems you can destroy.

        One day solar will be economical and useful, but that day has not yet arrived.

    • john byatt says:

      Eric you are pissing into the wind,

      • eworrall1 says:

        Lets see what happens to US wind if congress (hopefully) does not renew their subsidy.

        http://www.energytribune.com/66474/a-subsidy-thats-blowin-in-the-wind

      • john byatt says:

        It is false economy to continue to use a power source that is increasing the number and severity of extreme events around the world, now verified by numerous research papers. If a hurricane has caused 50 billion in loses when it would have only caused 10 billion without the increased wind speed , heavy precipitaion and higher storm surge contributed by AGW. then you might be able to claim that coal energy is more economical and efficient

        the facts refute your position, your choice may be, do we pay 10 billion extra for energy and save ourselves 40 billion in damages.
        renewable is and will be the far more economical choice.

    • Eric, your point about hydro schemes destroying river systems is certainly valid, but ALL forms of power generation are likely to have bad effects on the environment.
      You suggest that solar power is not yet viable. This is true in many places, but it is already arguably viable in South Australia where I live.

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