Highlights of WMO state of climate report in 2012: the years 2001-2011 the warmest on record

Still a pale blue dot at this point

Still a pale blue dot at this point

The World Meteorological Organisation has released its provisional Statement on the State of the Global Climate in 2012, and it makes sobering reading.

Some of the highlights worth noting:

The last eleven years (2001–2011) were among the top warmest years on record, and the first ten months of 2012 indicate that this year will not be an exception. The year was characterized by unusual warmth across most of the globe’s land areas and a weak-to moderate La Niña at the beginning of the year…

Which puts lie to the claim “warming stopped 16 years ago”. Across the globe, regions experienced record temperatures:

During the first ten months of 2012, above-average temperatures affected most of the globe’s land surface areas, most notably North America, southern Europe, western and central Russia, and parts of northern Africa. However, cooler-than-average conditions were observed across Alaska and parts of northern and eastern Australia.

And:

During the first ten months of 2012, above-average temperatures affected most of the globe’s land surface areas, most notably North America, southern Europe, western and central Russia, and parts of northern Africa. However, cooler-than-average conditions were observed across Alaska and parts of northern and eastern Australia.

Climate extremes are fast becoming the norm:

Major heat waves impacted the Northern Hemisphere during the year, with the most notable heat waves occurring in early Northern Hemisphere spring (March–May) across the contiguous United States and Europe. Summer-like temperatures affected a large portion of the U.S. and Europe throughout most of March 2012. The extraordinary warm spell resulted in nearly 15,000 new daily records for high maximum and minimum temperatures across the contiguous United States during March 2012, nearly double the number of broken records experienced during the August 2011 heat wave. The heat continued into the Northern Hemisphere summer (June–August), exacerbating drought conditions and fuelling wildfires. Greenland, which had above-average temperatures for much of the year, recorded its all time highest May maximum temperature, when temperatures soared to 24.8°C at Ivittuut/Narsarsuaq on May 29th…

And:

During April and May 2012, most of China experienced exceptional warmth, with most areas having anomalies as high as 5°C above the 196 1–1990 average.

The world saw extrme drought and wildfires:

2012 began with severe to exceptional drought, as defined by the North American Drought Monitor (NADM), across the south central and southeastern contiguous United States and the northern half of Mexico. In the southern Plains of the U.S., the 2012 drought was a continuation of severe drought conditions which developed in 2011. Throughout 2012, drought conditions evolved across the United States, improving in some areas while deteriorating in others. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM), nearly two-thirds of the contiguous United States (65.5 percent) was considered to be in moderate to exceptional drought…

Northern Hemisphere summer precipitation across sub-Saharan Africa was above average, with much of western Africa—specifically Senegal, southern Mauritania, western and eastern Mali, Niger, northern Burkina Faso—having 40 percent or more above normal precipitation, while several countries in the Gulf of Guinea and eastern Africa had precipitation deficits, recording only 70 percent of normal precipitation.

And:

Devastating floods impacted Pakistan during September 2012. Monsoonal rains prompted deadly floods across Pakistan, with Balochistan, Punjab, and Sindh the hardest hit regions. Over 5 million people and over 400,000 hectares of crops have been affected by floods, with more than 460,000 houses and infrastructures damaged or destroyed.

24 thoughts on “Highlights of WMO state of climate report in 2012: the years 2001-2011 the warmest on record

  1. Eric Worrall says:

    Nice piece of hype, but those treacherous graphs tell another story.

    http://woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1997/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1997/trend

    Less than 0.1c warming since 1997, despite a rise in CO2 from 363.71ppm in 1997 to 391.57 in 2011 (2012 annual mean isn’t out yet).

    According to NOAA (2008) this scenario represents 95% confidence alarmist climate models are busted.

    So keep up with the weather report (and ignore reports of unusual cold, such as the severe snow storms hitting Russia, Sweden and North East China).

  2. zoot says:

    Play close attention class, and you will see how Eric has got it wrong.
    http://woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1997/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1997/trend/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1997/to:2005/trend/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:2005/trend
    Global warming didn’t stop in 1997, it continued until 2005. And it has been followed by a dramatic cooling!!
    What is wrong with this interpretation?

    • Eric Worrall says:

      Your attempt to suggest 15 years with near zero warming is not significant is falsified by the NOAA State of the Climate Report 2008

      http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/cmb/bams-sotc/climate-assessment-2008-lo-rez.pdf

      Near-zero and even negative trends are common for intervals of a decade or less in the simulations, due to the model’s internal climate variability. The simulations rule out (at the 95% level) zero trends for intervals of 15 yr or more, suggesting that an observed absence of warming of this duration is needed to create a discrepancy with the expected present-day warming rate.

      This is going to get increasingly funny – in a couple of years we shall hit Ben Santer’s “17 years minimum significance for a climate trend”, and of course, in another 15 years, we’ll hit the magic 30 years.

  3. zoot says:

    Notice how Eric missed the point? Everyone with a brain knows that the seven year cooling trend is just noise.
    The important issue is that global warming did not stop in 1997 – it stopped in 2005!
    http://woodfortrees.org/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1990/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:1990/to:2005/trend/plot/hadcrut4gl/from:2005/trend
    Cherry picking 1990-2005 is just as valid as cherry picking 1997-2012. Let’s watch as Eric argues the opposite. Or will he concede he is wrong and that global warming didn’t stop in 1997, it stopped in 2005?

  4. john byatt says:

    And another cherry pick from gavin at GISS

    fun with graphs.

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