Israel’s tragedy

It’s December and “unseasonal heat” has lead to Israel’s worst natural disaster

Bushfires have killed dozens:

An estimated 13,000 people were forced to flee their homes in northern Israel Thursday and early Friday, as the worst bushfire in Israel’s history raged unchecked for 14 hours, killing 40 people and devouring everything in its path. The fire broke out shortly before noon Thursday on the Carmel hill, southeast of the port city of Haifa, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu described it as “a catastrophe, the likes of which we have not yet known”.

He appealed to Russia, Cyprus, Greece, Italy and other countries for help in putting out the fire and by early Friday morning, some 24 firefighting aircraft, as well as other equipment, from countries including Greece, Cyprus, France and Egypt, were mobilising for Israel or were already on their way.

This is after an August heat wave:

The heat wave that Israel has been experiencing this week continued unabated on Friday.

Nahum Malik of the Metrotech weather service said however that temperatures would begin a long-awaited downward turn on Saturday and could reach seasonal averages by Tuesday.

Thursday was the hottest day since the start of the week. Temperatures reached 39 degrees Celsius in Jerusalem (9 degrees above average), 38 degrees in Tzfat, 43 degrees at the Sea of Galilee and 46 degrees in Eilat.

Russia, Pakistan…

No, nothing to worry about.

7 thoughts on “Israel’s tragedy

  1. John R T says:

    Neighboring, non-Isreali, arsonists continue their terrorist attacks.
    Read the news, Mike.

    • Watching the Deniers says:

      And I’m a former volunteer firefighter, understand how fires are started. Without the right conditions, the fires aren’t as intense. Get a clue John.

      • klem says:

        That’s right, fires in dry conditions burn brightly, fires in wet conditions not so much. And Isreal has only had dry conditions for exactly as long as we have been burning fossil fuels, before that it was wet and forest fires never occured. So fossil fuels are the cause.

        (Jee, I’m starting to like just making stuff up, just like a real AGW alarmist)

  2. marg says:

    I remember when Israel was being established, that Australia provided thousands and thousands of eucalyptus trees to create forests. I wonder if they contributed to the problem?

    • klem says:

      No No it can’t be blamed on the Australians, it can only be blamed on climate change from the burning of fossil fuels. That’s right, drink the kool-aid.

  3. Watching the Deniers says:

    The cause being discussed:

    http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/negligence-probable-cause-of-israel-fire/story-e6frfku0-1225965747577

    “…THE cause of the worst forest fire in Israel’s history is likely negligence, not arson, authorities have revealed as firefighters from around the world battled the blaze whipping through northern pine forests towards the Mediterranean.”

    I’ll clarify my view: I don’t think we can attribute these fires to climate change… however:

    “Israel is in the midst of a drought, with barely any rain and continuing high temperatures since last spring… After a long, dry summer Israel is experiencing an unusually warm and dry autumn.

    The Israel Meteorological Service listed the midday temperature in the Haifa area on Thursday as 31 degrees Celsius with winds reaching 30 kilometres per hour.”

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/12/03/3083410.htm

    Israel’s own scientists predicted such events ten years ago:

    http://www.physorg.com/news/2010-12-scientist-israel-typical-climate-effects.html

    The fire disaster in the Carmel Mountains near Haifa is a typical example of climate change effect and a taste of the future, says Dr. Guy Pe’er, one of the authors of Israel’s first report to the UN on climate change. Ten years ago, Dr. Pe’er and other Israeli scientists collated knowledge about the effects of climate change for Israel. They warned already in the year 2000 of expected climatic fluctuations, heat events, decreased rainfall and delayed late winter rainfall, all of which would lead to increased risk of intense forest fires…”

    So, ten years ago they predicted:

    – warmer Autumn
    – delayed winter rains
    – heat waves
    – more forest fires

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